Almost got rid of numbers, and then…

Published:

With the upcoming trip in Spring, and the related episode length/frequency change for Sponge, I wondered if I should be getting rid of numbers in the titles of future episodes. The title structure, so far, has been:

“001_Hello blah blah this is the title.”

From that, it was gonna be:

“Hello it’s me again, just the title, without a number.”

I was thinking about this since yesterday. Then I went to Apple podcasts, randomly, and realized that the “episode number” field in Anchor (Spotify for Podcasters) was showing up as SEASON NUMBER…! So, it looked like Sponge was on Season 47…!

I went to Anchor and started removing episode numbers, one by one, hoping that Apple was gonna forget that it ever mistook episode numbers for season numbers. That way, hopefully, maybe, it was just gonna number the titles, in order. (I wasn’t surprised that such a mistaking did happen. Apple’s system wasn’t connected to Spotify’s system the correct way… or something along those lines, was what I guessed. That’s possible. Spotify/Anchor, perhaps, doesn’t know how all the various platforms function… ALTHOUGH, come on. It’s Apple podcast. It’s pretty huge. Spotify/Anchor should know how it is feeding data into Apple.)

But then, suddenly, on Anchor, old episodes started saving with today’s date, even though I didn’t touch the date field.

But for a while, I didn’t notice this…

And would’ve not noticed it…

Had I not had the numbers in the titles!

Suddenly, I realized that Anchor was showing me episode 38 after episode 33. Where had episodes 34-37 gone? They’d saved themselves to the January 17th, 2024 date. So, I went back in again and manually adjusted the published dates back to their original dates.

All this to say:

Okay, numbers are staying in the episode titles. I don’t care that numbers are superfluous for algorithms. They are definitely helpful for humans, especially for a human who is editing stuff, DID NOT TOUCH THE DATE FIELD, and yet, is faced with the evil system that randomly adjusts the original published date to the current date.

Also:

If things go wrong due to machines, it won’t be because the machine overlords are too smart. It won’t be because humans were “replaced” by robots due to robotic genius.

Nay, the much likelier scenario: Some group of silly humans makes a system that randomly adjusts the date field. As in, the system doesn’t even adjust the date field consistently. Like, it just sometimes adjusts the date field, but sometimes does not. The thing has feelings and sometimes feels like adjusting it, sometimes not. And it so happens that one such date field is connected to a bomb initiation sequence, or some such thing. That random explosion from a wrongly-set date field is what’s gonna doom us all.

In other words, if humanity goes down because of machines, it will be due to the stupidity of humanity that built those machines, not because machines become too smart.

The end.